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【青少读物】纳尼亚传奇双语阅读Chapter 1
Maggie 2015-11-26 11:55:43 发表于  [  实用英语  ]
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Lucy Looks into a Wardrobe.

 

ONCE there were four children whose names were Peter Susan Edmund and Lucy. This story is about something that happened to them when they were sent away from London during the war because of the air-raids. They were sent to the house of an old Professor who lived in the heart of the country ten miles from the nearest railway station and two miles from the nearest post office. He had no wife and he lived in a very large house with a housekeeper called Mrs Macready and three servants. (Their names were Ivy Margaret and Betty but they do not come into the story much.) He himself was a very old man with shaggy white hair which grew over most of his face as well as on his head and they liked him almost at once; but on the first evening when he came out to meet them at the front door he was so odd-looking that Lucy (who was the youngest) was a little afraid of him and Edmund (who was the next youngest) wanted to laugh and had to keep on pretending he was blowing his nose to hide it.

 

As soon as they had said good night to the Professor and gone upstairs on the first night the boys came into the girls room and they all talked it over.

 

"Weve fallen on our feet and no mistake" said Peter. "This is going to be perfectly splendid. That old chap will let us do anything we like."

 

"I think hes an old dear" said Susan.

 

"Oh come off it!" said Edmund who was tired and pretending not to be tired which always made him bad-tempered. "Dont go on talking like that."

 

"Like what?" said Susan; "and anyway its time you were in bed."

 

"Trying to talk like Mother" said Edmund. "And who are you to say when Im to go to bed? Go to bed yourself."

 

"Hadnt we all better go to bed?" said Lucy. "Theres sure to be a row if were heard talking here."

 

"No there wont" said Peter. "I tell you this is the sort of house where no ones going to mind what we do. Anyway they wont hear us. Its about ten minutes walk from here down to that dining-room and any amount of stairs and passages in between."

 

"Whats that noise?" said Lucy suddenly. It was a far larger house than she had ever been in before and the thought of all those long passages and rows of doors leading into empty rooms was beginning to make her feel a little creepy. "Its only a bird silly" said Edmund.

 

"Its an owl" said Peter. "This is going to be a wonderful place for birds. I shall go to bed now. I say lets go and explore tomorrow. You might find anything in a place like this. Did you see those mountains as we came along? And the woods? There might be eagles. There might be stags. Therell be hawks."

 

"Badgers!" said Lucy.

 

"Foxes!" said Edmund.

 

"Rabbits!" said Susan.

 

But when next morning came there was a steady rain falling so thick that when you looked out of the window you could see neither the mountains nor the woods nor even the stream in the garden.

 

"Of course it would be raining!" said Edmund. They had just finished their breakfast with the Professor and were upstairs in the room he had set apart for them - a long low room with two windows looking out in one direction and two in another.

 

"Do stop grumbling Ed" said Susan. "Ten to one itll clear up in an hour or so. And in the meantime were pretty well off. Theres a wireless and lots of books."

 

"Not for me"said Peter; "Im going to explore in the house."

 

Everyone agreed to this and that was how the adventures began. It was the sort of house that you never seem to come to the end of and it was full of unexpected places. The first few doors they tried led only into spare bedrooms as everyone had expected that they would; but soon they came to a very long room full of pictures and there they found a suit of armour; and after that was a room all hung with green with a harp in one corner; and then came three steps down and five steps up and then a kind of little upstairs hall and a door that led out on to a balcony and then a whole series of rooms that led into each other and were lined with books - most of them very old books and some bigger than a Bible in a church. And shortly after that they looked into a room that was quite empty except for one big wardrobe; the sort that has a looking-glass in the door. There was nothing else in the room at all except a dead blue-bottle on the window-sill.

 

"Nothing there!" said Peter and they all trooped out again - all except Lucy. She stayed behind because she thought it would be worth while trying the door of the wardrobe even though she felt almost sure that it would be locked. To her surprise it opened quite easily and two moth-balls dropped out.

 

Looking into the inside she saw several coats hanging up - mostly long fur coats. There was nothing Lucy liked so much as the smell and feel of fur. She immediately stepped into the wardrobe and got in among the coats and rubbed her face against them leaving the door open of course because she knew that it is very foolish to shut oneself into any wardrobe. Soon she went further in and found that there was a second row of coats hanging up behind the first one. It was almost quite dark in there and she kept her arms stretched out in front of her so as not to bump her face into the back of the wardrobe. She took a step further in - then two or three steps always expecting to feel woodwork against the tips of her fingers. But she could not feel it.

 

"This must be a simply enormous wardrobe!" thought Lucy going still further in and pushing the soft folds of the coats aside to make room for her. Then she noticed that there was something crunching under her feet. "I wonder is that more mothballs?" she thought stooping down to feel it with her hand. But instead of feeling the hard smooth wood of the floor of the wardrobe she felt something soft and powdery and extremely cold. "This is very queer" she said and went on a step or two further.

 

Next moment she found that what was rubbing against her face and hands was no longer soft fur but something hard and rough and even prickly. "Why it is just like branches of trees!" exclaimed Lucy. And then she saw that there was a light ahead of her; not a few inches away where the back of the wardrobe ought to have been but a long way off. Something cold and soft was falling on her. A moment later she found that she was standing in the middle of a wood at night-time with snow under her feet and snowflakes falling through the air. Lucy felt a little frightened but she felt very inquisitive and excited as well. She looked back over her shoulder and there between the dark tree trunks; she could still see the open doorway of the wardrobe and even catch a glimpse of the empty room from which she had set out. (She had of course left the door open for she knew that it is a very silly thing to shut oneself into a wardrobe.) It seemed to be still daylight there. "I can always get back if anything goes wrong" thought Lucy. She began to walk forward crunch-crunch over the snow and through the wood towards the other light. In about ten minutes she reached it and found it was a lamp-post. As she stood looking at it wondering why there was a lamp-post in the middle of a wood and wondering what to do next she heard a pitter patter of feet coming towards her. And soon after that a very strange person stepped out from among the trees into the light of the lamp-post.

 

He was only a little taller than Lucy herself and he carried over his head an umbrella white with snow. From the waist upwards he was like a man but his legs were shaped like a goats (the hair on them was glossy black) and instead of feet he had goats hoofs. He also had a tail but Lucy did not notice this at first because it was neatly caught up over the arm that held the umbrella so as to keep it from trailing in the snow. He had a red woollen muffler round his neck and his skin was rather reddish too. He had a strange but pleasant little face with a short pointed beard and curly hair and out of the hair there stuck two horns one on each side of his forehead. One of his hands as I have said held the umbrella: in the other arm he carried several brown-paper parcels. What with the parcels and the snow it looked just as if he had been doing his Christmas shopping. He was a Faun. And when he saw Lucy he gave such a start of surprise that he dropped all his parcels.

 

"Goodness gracious me!" exclaimed the Faun.



露茜窥探衣橱


从前,有这么四个孩子,他们的名字分别叫彼得、苏珊、爱德蒙和露茜。下面讲的故事就是他们亲身经历过的事情。

那是在战争时期,为了躲避空袭,他们被送离伦敦,来到一位老教授的家里。这位老教授的家在英国的中部,离最近的火车站有十英里远,离最近的邮局也有两英里。他没有老伴,和女管家玛卡蕾蒂太太以及另外三个仆人一起,住着一所很大很大的房子(这三个仆人一个叫爱薇,一个叫玛格丽特,还有一个叫蓓蒂,但她们在这个故事中出现的不多)。教授已经老态龙钟,一头蓬乱的白发。孩子们一来就喜欢上了他。但在头天傍晚,当他从大门口出来迎接他们一行的时候,他的这副怪模样使年龄最小的露茜感到有点害怕,而爱德蒙呢(除了露茜他年龄最小),却忍不住要笑,他只好一次又一次的装做擦鼻涕,这才没有笑出声来。

第一天晚上,他们向老教授道了晚安,就一起上楼,两个男孩来到女孩子的寝室,互相交谈起来。

“我们的确运气不错,”彼得说,“这儿太好了,我们高兴干啥就可以干啥,这位老先生是不会管我们的。”

“我看他是个惹人喜欢的老头。”苏珊说。

“哎呀,别东拉西扯了!”爱德蒙说,他已经很累了,但偏偏装作不累的样子,每当这时,他往往要发脾气,“别再说这些啦!”

“说什么才好?”苏珊回了他一句,“你该睡了。”

“你倒学着妈妈教训起我来了,”爱德蒙说,“你是什么人?我什么时间睡,还要你管!你自己去睡吧。”

“大家都睡,好不好?”露茜调解说,“如果人家听见我们还在这儿说话,非要骂我们不可。”

“根本不会,”彼德说,“我不是说过,在老教授家里,谁也不会管我们的吗?再说,他们也不会听见我们讲话。从这里下去到饭厅,中间有这么多楼梯和过道,大约要走十分钟的路。”

“什么声音?”露茜突然问道。这所房子比她以前住过的任何一所房子都要大得多,一想到那些长长过道和一排排通向空荡荡的房间的门,她就感到有点儿害怕,浑身都起了鸡皮疙瘩。

“傻东西,这是鸟儿叫。”爱德蒙说。

“这是猫头鹰的叫声。”彼得说,“这里是各种鸟儿栖息的最好场所。我要去睡啦。喂,我们明天去探险吧。在这样一个地方,随便什么东西你也许都可以找到。在来的路上,你们看见了那些山没有?还有那些树林?那里也许有鹰啊,鹿,鹫啊。”

“有獾吗?”露茜问。

“还有蛇!”爱德蒙说。

“还有狐狸呢!!”苏珊说。

但第二天早晨,却冷沥沥地下起雨来了。雨很大,透过窗子朝外望去,你既看不见山,也看不见树林,甚至连花园里的小溪也看不见。

“没有办法,天大概还要下雨,我们只好听天由命喽,”爱德蒙说。他们刚和教授一起吃好了早饭,就来到楼上教授给他们安排的房间。这是一个狭长而又低矮的房间,两头各开着两扇窗子可以看到外面。

“别发牢骚,艾德,”苏珊说,“说不定过个把小时以后,天会转晴。就是现在,也不是没有什么可玩的。这里有无线电,还有许多书。”

“我才不稀罕这些玩意儿呢,”彼得说,“我要在这所住宅内进行探险。”

大家都同意彼得的这个建议,一场奇遇就是这样开始的。这所住宅,你似乎永远也走不到它的尽头,里边净是些意料不到的地方。他们先试着打开了几扇门,原来是几间无人居住的空房间,这是大家事先预料到的。接下来,他们进了一个非常狭长的房间,墙上挂满了画,他们还在屋内发现了一副盔甲。然后,他们又进了另一个房间,里面全是绿色的装饰物,只是在角落里放着一把竖琴。这以后,他们走过一下一上的两段楼梯,来到楼上的一间小厅,小厅有一扇门通向外面的阳台。从小厅出来以后,他们又走进了一连串各自相通的房间,里面都放满了书,这些书绝大部分都是很旧的,有些比教堂里的《圣经》还要大。他们在这里逗留了片刻,又顺路走进另一个空荡荡的房间望了一下,只见里面放着一只很大很大的衣橱,橱门上镶着镜子。除了窗台上面放着一个褪了色的蓝花瓶以外,别的什么也没有了。

“这有啥意思?”彼得说。大家都跟着走出去了,只有露茜一个人留在后面。她想试试能否把那个大衣橱打开,尽管她几乎肯定衣橱的门是锁着的。她自己都没有想到,橱门竟然很容易的被打开了,里面还滚出了两颗樟脑丸。

她朝橱里仔细看了一下,里面并排挂着好几件外套,几乎全都是长长的皮外套。这些衣服摸上去软绵绵的,还带有樟脑丸的清香,露茜高兴极了。她一步跨进衣橱,挤到皮衣中间,把她的小脸蛋贴在毛茸茸的皮衣上轻轻地摩擦。当然喽,她让橱门开在那儿,因为她知道,一个人把自己关在衣橱里是非常愚蠢的。她往里挪动了一下身子,发现在第一排衣服的后面还挂着一排衣服,里面黑糊糊是。她把两只手往前伸,生怕自己的脸碰到了橱的后壁。她向前又跨了一步,接着两步,三步,想用手指尖摸到木头的橱壁,但她始终没能摸到。

“这个衣橱多大啊!”露茜一边暗自想,一边又继续往前走。她不时拨开交迭着的柔软的皮衣,为自己开路。这时,她感到脚底下有什么东西在“吱嘎”“吱嘎”作响。“我难道踩着了樟脑丸了?”她想,一边蹲下身来用手去摸。然而她摸到的不是坚硬而又光滑的木头橱底,而是一样柔软的、粉末似的、冰冷的东西。“多么奇怪啊?”她一边说,一边又朝前走了一两步。

她很快就发现,碰在她脸上和手上的已不再是软绵绵的皮毛了,而是一种又坚硬又粗糙甚至有点戳手的东西。“哎呦,这像树枝嘛!”露茜一声惊叫。这时,她看见前面亮着一盏灯。本来衣橱后壁只有几英寸远,但这盏灯看上去却在老远老远的地方。一种轻飘飘的冰冷的东西落在她身上。一会儿以后,她发现自己站在深夜的树林中,雪花正从空中飘落下来,她的脚下全是积雪。

露茜有点害怕起来,但同时又感到好奇和兴奋。她回头望去,穿过树干与树干之间的幽暗的空隙,依然可以看到敞开着的橱门,甚至还可以瞥见她从那里进来的那间空屋。(当然,她是让橱门开着的,因为她知道,把自己关在衣橱里是件非常愚蠢的事)。那里好像还是白天。“即使出了什么事,我也能回去。”露茜想。她又继续朝前走,“嘎吱”、“嘎吱”的踩着积雪,穿过树林,一直朝着那盏灯走去。

大约走了十分钟,她就到了那里,原来这是一根灯柱。正当她凝神望着灯柱,猜测着为什么在树林中有一个灯柱,考虑着下一步该怎么办的时候,她猛地听到一阵“啪嗒”“啪嗒”的脚步声。没多久,从树林中走出一个样子奇怪的人,一直来到灯柱下面。

这人只比露茜略高一点,头上打着一把伞,伞上满是雪,一片白色。他的上半身看起来像人,但他的腿却像山羊,上面的毛黑油油的;他没有脚,却长着山羊的蹄子。他还有一条尾巴,但露茜最初并没有看见。因为怕拖在雪地里搞脏,他把它放在拿伞的那个手臂弯里。他的颈项里围着一条红色的羊毛围巾,红扑扑的小脸,长相有点奇怪,却又惹人喜欢。他留着尖尖的短胡子,长着卷曲的头发,额头两边各长着一只角。他一只手撑着伞,另一只手臂抱着几个棕色的纸包。看起来,他很像刚买了东西回来准备过圣诞节的。原来,他就是古罗马农牧之神丰讷。当他发现露茜时,他大吃一惊,手中所有的纸包都掉落在雪地上。

“天哪!”羊怪惊叫了一声。


Maggie 2021-06-21 06:45:41 重新编辑

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